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Regional FlagHow is getting rid of Cantha a 'universal' representation of humanity?Source
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scizwig.5492
Target Source
#1 -

I just heard news that Cantha might not ever be making its way back into GW2 as an unnamed artist for Anet has said: "NCsoft was firm in its decision to stay away from “Asian” themes and keep it “universal.” ArenaNet had to make adjustments quickly. A small number of you may recall that the human story was originally split by Canthans/Elonians/Ascalonians instead of the current Streets/Commoner/Noble paths. Divinity’s Reach originally had sections dedicated to the three cultures as well (Ossan Quarters & Rurikton are the current “versions” perhaps?) ArenaNet obeyed NCsoft’s suggestion and halted all Canthan productions, including the once-existing Canthan sector of Divinity’s Reach…. Because of time restrictions, they had to erase the Canthan sector of DR quickly. The current result is “The Great Collapse.” It’s an inside joke now, she says. The “Collapse” symbolizes what was once an idea that didn’t make it all the way. She further states that ArenaNet had to come up with some new lore to cover up the lack of Canthan content — hence the Emperor’s decree (read lore on Wiki). That’s all I have."

Regardless if this true or not, it is ridiculous. The game world is made universal because it has more than one type/race of human. In GW1 I saw it like this:
Kryta= Greece, Ascalon =European, Istan and Kourna= African, Vabbi and Orr= Arabic and lastly Cantha represented Asia, mostly China/Japan/Korea. That universal diversity is what made Guild Wars such a compelling game. By trying to represent most cultures, you created something universal. I think it is a huge mistake that NCsoft think that universal should mean some sort of one ‘common race’, that because of sexual mingling has come about. That being the only way for it to come about… It is unbelievable to think that entire continent can be erased from a game for the sake of PR.

Cantha and Factions had some of the very best concepts about it in terms of map design and cultural lore. From The training Island to the main land the entire game was beautiful, and the giant city, felt like a giant city. I have actually gotten myself lost in it many times. In fact for quite a lot of people I know, Factions is what got them playing GW in the first place… I know that doesn’t count for much but still.

But what I am most annoyed about, is that you guys (anet) have always been ‘we talk to our player-base’ If this about Cantha is true, then surely this is something we need to talk about. As this is no small thing, it is an entire section of lore and some of your best work going down the drain for no real good reason. Even if this is a thing set in stone, I think it is unfair that the player-base’s opinions go left unheard. It could even be possible that if NCsoft realise how much we love that part of the game, they might change their minds. After the whole Mass effect thing, I think anything is possible with enough voices.

Anyway I just thought I should say something and hopefully people agree and that we can rescue Cathan from the ideas bin.


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ArenaNet Poster
Target Source
#82 -

Cantha was my favorite GW1 region to work on. And I worked on every GW release. I know a lot of the dev team loved it and would love to revisit it. I kinda agree with critickitten about the negative aspect of tight corridors. Most of that came from hitting technological limits while trying to keep the epic quality of the concept art. I think we could do some really amazing things with those themes in our new engine. Certainly nothing is ruled out. I certainly encourage anyone to express your desire for a Cantha region in GW2 in a positive and friendly way. It could be years away, but it’s worth asking for.


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ArenaNet Poster
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#141 -

Pure target audience strategy. They saw how westerners rejected Asian elements during Mists of Pandaria development, so they took it as a business rule and wanted to surf on the rejection. That is speculation of course, but it is so obvious …

That’s not what happened. This went down long before anyone even know MOP was coming. It was simply a cultural consideration.


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ArenaNet Poster
Target Source
#155 -

If the only options at the end of the day were that Anet has to make the concession to keep Cantha uniformally one Asian culture moving forward, or never have it then I bet most of us would accept that concession even though it sucks that they have to be “sensitive” to those issues for political reasons. There’s a lot that goes on that we never hear about and never will hear about, and have really no right to hear about at this point in time in regards to the business and relations portion of ArenaNet and the game. As Josh said, many of the developers would love to return to Cantha, I bet many of them would rather do it sooner than later, but there’s probably a lot they have to do in order to move forward with Cantha and I sincerely hope they will and if there’s a way for them to make it happen I am sure they will.

That’s a very good way of putting it. I certainly don’t know where, when, or how the decision was made. I’m just a map artist. So I’m not in a position to critique it. I also don’t know the extent of the decision. For all I know it was some producer in Korea who doesn’t work there any more and the next time it’s brought up there will be no problem. Or maybe there will be one or two tweaks that will fix the problem. Who knows?


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ArenaNet Poster
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#172 -

Without ourselves knowing the true situation and full extent of the decision, maybe we players shouldn’t fill in the blanks with “NCSoft Overlords perma-banned Cantha!?!?” I for one will try to stay open and keep hoping!

Indeed. I’ve been in this industry for 16 years and worked with a several publishers including Interplay, Sierra, THQ and now NCSoft. And for what it’s worth, the amount of creative freedom that NCSoft gives ArenaNet is MASSIVE compared to the others. NCSoft is crazy successful for a reason. They recognize the talent here and support us with a very hands-off policy in general. They give us a LOT of feedback and data to work with, but I’ve never got the impression that they are overlords like I have with the other publishers I’ve worked under.