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Putting the Guild Back Into Guild Wars Part 2: Guild Management


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#1 shanaeri rynale

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 04:42 PM

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In this second part of my "Putting the Guild Back into Guild Wars" series, we’ll be taking an in-depth look at how to organize your guild, the pitfalls involved with guilds, and then some pointers as to how to make your guild succeed. We’ll also be looking at the various Guild Management functions of Guild Wars 2 and the best ways to use the tools available.

You might remember in the previous article we talked about the sorts of questions you should be asking to help make a guild, and of the policies and processes you should be thinking about as you do so. This article is pretty in-depth on the topics of guild structures and leadership hints, so feel free to jump around to the parts you feel most relevant to you.

Guilds and the management of them are not only a very complicated subject, but also an emotive one. No one wants to be called a bad guild leader and everyone wants their guild to be amazing and wonderful. However, even if this is old hat or irrelevant to you there is always room to learn and hopefully these next couple of sections will do just that.

If your guild is going to be a small or a casual group of friends then a lot of this won’t apply, however as you grow and evolve it’s probably worth knowing it in advance. I’ll start off with some basics.

"It's Just a Game Isn't It?"
For sure it most certainly is, except one thing: it has real people behind those pretty pixels you see on screen. In Skyrim, the nords don’t rage at you for quitting mid quest, no one minds if you are rude to every NPC and most importantly you can act how the hell you like with almost no consequences.

In an MMO this all changes. You form friendships, make enemies and interact with people you most likely will never see in person. So even though the medium you interact with is pretend, the people who interact with are certainly not.

Wikipedia defines an organization as a "social group which distributes tasks for a collective goal". This sounds like a lot like a guild to me. We have a purpose, we have people and regardless of the actual workings a structure.

Now, since we want to make a success of our guild, and it will be an organization, it makes perfect sense to look at what works in real life, use real life principles and real life experiences and make best use them. What works for real organizations is what will work here because we are a real life organization. It's just that the medium we choose to interact with people is virtual.

Many, many in-game guilds and alliances have failed because they did not take note or use this inevitable and incontrovertible truth.

"Okay, So What Works Then?"
Since we are an organization it makes sense to know what works and what does not. Let’s start with the two basic forms of organizing people: hierarchical and matrix.

Matrix management assumes there is no one person responsible for any one thing, information and decision making is divided equally between individuals.

The typical small or casual guild is organized in this way. There is only a guild leader because the game requires there to be one in the roster. Everyone could be an officer, the guild leader might switch around on a rota basis or the guild leader assumes everyone has an equal vote in everything.

In short it looks like this:


With small numbers of people it’s relatively easy to manage and indeed works well, as information flows freely and quickly without much risk of error, after all each "node" carries the risk of the "Chinese Whisper" effect.






Now, let’s double the Guild size to 16.

As can easily be seen the number of interactions required to make a decision increases exponentially, the organization starts to get swamped with opinions, views and "best ways to do things".







Just for fun let’s make this chart the size of an average guild, that of 49 people.

Now if every person (node) has to have a say or be told something then the result is clearly chaos, paralysis and because decision making is delayed the decisions are weakened and unreliable. Politics then takes over resulting in an eventual catastrophic breakdown. There wasn’t room on my screen or time to draw the several hundred node one, but you get the idea.







The strengths of a matrix structure are while it is small, decisions and communications flow well and there is a tight knit-feel to things. This is why small guilds feel more family like than larger ones.

The downsides are obvious once one gets above a certain size. Now what this number is is dependent on the skills and character of the people that is inside of that organization. However, experience has shown that above about 30 active players the model starts to break down, and above 70 active players usually becomes totally unworkable.

The Other Model is That of a Hierarchical Structure
Most of us are familiar with this in some shape or form as these are the ones we see in day to day work and life, so I’ll skim over the diagrams and get right to the pros and cons.

In a small organization (read: guild) a Hierarchical Model does not work. It is overly bureaucratic, breeds a “them and us” feeling and promotes a hungry for power style of culture.

However, in a larger organization, it simplifies decision making, clarifies lines of communication and reduces the politics due to lack of clarity. The downsides are that if the structure is too top heavy, has too many layers or poor leaders, that the tendency is a subconscious move towards a matrix structure. People bypass the "chain of command" and so the structure will eventually fail for the same reasons as a matrix one would.

Often larger guilds try and combine the two, a hierarchical structure in terms of leaders and officers but also sub-divide of their guild into chapters, or departments, so as to make use of a matrix structure. If you can pull it off, this can work very well as each guild member will feel part of a close knit group as well as having the benefit of a clear direction and decision making structure. This sort of combination is very hard to pull off successfully but will reap huge benefits over time. In my experience there has to be a lot of trust in your officers and members and of them in you to make this work.

"What Makes a Good Leader?"
Since most guilds have more than 30 people, a matrix style structure is clearly not going to work all that well. This means that the best option is to have a hierarchical one. However, the most critical factor in this type of structure is the quality of the leader at each level in the chain.

Below are 13 tips and bits of advice to help you and me become better guild leaders. There have been thousands of books written on how to be a better leader, so I would suggest hitting the books to help you understand more of what makes a good leader. History shows us, that an organization rises or falls on the ability of the leaders so it makes (to me) complete sense to learn and be as good as one as possible.

Personally I’ve found books on leadership by Dr John Maxwell, Stephen Covey, Warren Bennis and Dale Carnegie to be a great help, but there are many, many more. This short wiki article on Tuckman’s stages of group development is also a great starting to place as it helps show how your Guild will behave when it’s launched and as it progresses over time.

Tips and Hints for Guild Leaders
  • Delegate, delegate, delegate. Not only will it take a whole load of pressure off you, it will give your guild members something to aspire to. Treat every new guild member as though they could be your next officer and your next officer as a potential guild leader. That’s right, aim to train yourself out of a job. Also, ensure there is no over-reliance on any one person, be that for doing events or paying the bills.
  • Promote because of character, not of ability or because they are your best friend. A bad officer can ruin a guild in no time, so choose them carefully. Personally I never promote someone who asks me to be an officer. As soon as they do, they go to the bottom of my list.
  • You MUST be the most active or very close to it in your guild. As a guild leader you cannot expect any growth in your guild if you're not active. People will get discouraged quickly with a guild where the leader has weeks since logged on time consistently. When you do go on vacation, let guildies know when you’ll be back and who you left in charge in the meantime
  • You must promote activity like crazy. Even when no one else is talking, you may often times be forced to talk to yourself (but not too often). But if you want to build the community amongst your members, you have to be the one to instigate it at the very start unless you're lucky to find those special members that do it for you. Try to encourage people to run their own events, and make them feel like doing so.
  • Don't expect to have much time for yourself. You exist for the guild, not them for you. Of course the more you delegate and train members, the easier your life will become.
  • Have, at minimum, a loosely defined objective or, at best, a well-defined objective. Having a well-defined objective for your guild will let recruits know what your guild is about. It will also help in the recruiting process. Most people are looking for something in a guild, and if you can fulfill that something they will want to join you, and if you don't fulfill that something, it helps keep disgruntled members from ever joining your guild in the first place.
  • Keep your roster up to date. Having a long list of inactive members can be subtly discouraging to your members who are active, especially if those who are active are few in numbers.
  • Use the many communication tools available to you! A guild with a website, mumble/teamspeak/ventrillo server and a forum has that much more opportunity to stay in touch with its members and grow as a community, of gamers and friends.
  • As your guild grows, keep a decent ratio of officers to guild members. Try to space out your officers online times to fit the member online times. Having any given officer online at any given time a member is on can help tremendously with activity, and overall member morale.
  • Be organized. In everything that you do, be organized about it. Guild events that go poorly because of bad organization is one of the quickest ways to lose members, especially in Guild Wars 2, because guild hopping is so easy. Even if it wasn't the best experience, if it was well organized people have hope for the next time.
  • Be humble. Welcome advice, suggestions and comments from members and be willing to use them. Your members are there for you just as much as you are there for your members. Most people like to give input to their guild if they care about it. So be open to suggestions and ask for them often. Also don’t forget to give credit where it’s due.
  • Settle disputes quickly. Disputes amongst guild members must be dealt with swiftly in order to create harmony within the guild. There's nothing worse than a long drawn out fight amongst guild members that can cause splits and lost members, even those not involved.
  • Finally, set a good example. How you play the game, the things you say, the things you do, will set the tone for the guild on the whole. So, if you're a jerk, often times the guild will become a group of jerks and those that are'nt will generally leave. If you're a considerate nice person, the guild will become a group of considerate nice people, and those that are jerks will either leave or get booted quickly. You will attract and keep like-minded people. For example, it’s unlikely you’ll be able to keep a hard core PvP’er happy if you are a casual, part time PvE player and Guild.
"Dem's Da Rules."
Now let’s move onto rules: how and why are they here and why have them.

In a perfect world, there would be no requirement for rules. The relationships between people would be perfect and all would be bird songs and butterflies. Since it isn’t, we need certain rules to be put into place and mentioned up front, to not only show people what we deem to be acceptable, but to also show people what we will allow to happen and will not allow.

Again, in a smaller guild/organization, these rules are not as needed because the relationships between the members are such that everyone understands as part of the culture what is "right" and "wrong". Now, in a larger organization, you need these to be in place because people will have differing views on things and what should be done about them.

A set of rules that encompasses the whole organization is utterly necessary for the smooth running of that organization. Again, taking what works in real life we see that every club, sport, or company has a set of fundamental rules on which it is based so why should a guild be the exception?

On the other side of the coin, too many rules cause stagnation and stifle peoples expression, so therefore the rules must be the bare minimum to make it work, but not too few as to leave loopholes and exploits for people to take advantage. Rules should also need to be added or changed if additional clarity is required, in response to certain situations or even removed if they are no longer necessary.

More importantly, the rules should be an expression of the culture and relationships of the guild rather than that of imposing a different culture on people. The closer we get to "the perfect world" the less rules we need, as the behavior people don’t want to see comes naturally rather than having to be enforced.

Managing Guilds in Guild Wars 2
If you’ve read this far, great! If you’ve skipped to this bit then welcome.

Choosing a server
On the face of it, choosing a server for your guild is very stressful and fraught with risk. It could be an expensive mistake to choose the wrong one. Factors to consider are:
  • Language and culture. From what you’ve seen does the server look likely to match your language and culture?
  • Play Style. Will you and your guildies find like-minded people who enjoy doing what you do?
  • Timezones. For WvW you want a server with great 24-hour coverage, but what about PvE? Will there be enough people on to do PvE and dungeons? Will your members have latency issues if they roll onto a different regions server?
It has to be remembered that not every guild will add themselves to a signup sheet, nor will they all have made a decision yet and be willing to share it(some might even give wrong information so as to fool others). Therefore you should look for probabilities, not certainties. Also there will be no such as a perfect server for you, so my best advice is to seek out similar minded guilds and find out where they are going. A great bunch of friends will go a long way to overcoming any server limitations you might find.

Because of the guesting system, being on another server because your server is full or you want to be elsewhere is not as disastrous as it is in other MMO’s. While it can be disappointing, the important thing is to be able to play with your friends, which apart from a single game type you can do just that.

To help you decide here is a fan created site to see who is rolling where.

Forming a Guild
Forming a new guild ought to be as simple as just earning the 1 silver, pressing G and then starting your guild. In the game that’s all you need to do.


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However there are a few things to bear in mind first of all (apart from the name, tag and server you will go on). Although these were talked about in the previous article we’ll take a look at ranks within the Guild and setting them up in advance.


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You’ll want to think of the ranks you will need well in advance of forming the Guild. Only give the permissions to people that they will need to do the role you plan for them to do. The Permissions available are:
  • Edit Ranks
  • Edit Guild Emblem
  • Claim/Unclaim WvW Forts
  • Queue Upgrades
  • Modify Upgrade In Progress
  • Activate Built Upgrades
  • Admin Lower Ranks
  • Edit Message of the Day
  • Display Guild Emblem
  • Guild Stash Deposit
  • Guild Stash Withdraw
  • Treasure Trove Deposit
  • Treasure Trove Withdraw
  • New Members Here
It’s entirely up to you how you organize yourself, but a suggestion is to let everyone claim/unclaim a WvW structure as the last thing you want to do is to have to be called away at a moments notice to claim a hard won structure only have it snatched away because you were too slow.

It’s best to lay these permissions out in a spreadsheet table so you can see who can do what. This way, when it comes to start the guild, all you need to do is create this table in game and get on with the fun part of inviting and promoting.

Inviting, Promoting and Kicking people
While you can use the Guild Roster Panel to invite people, using the invite box by far the easiest way is to use right click on the person’s name in the chat box. Promoting and kicking people is also done by right clicking on the person’s name in the roster and selecting either kick or promote (try not to get them mixed up :) ).


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When you do need to kick a member, make sure they understand why the decision was made. Personally I always tried to find a guild more suited to their personality for them so they didn’t feel as rejected and always had a place to go to. It didn’t always work, but I always felt as though the effort was appreciated.

In my guild we always gave a person a "strike" and explained why they got it and what they can do to avoid another one. This way it was always their actions that determined a kick, and not our itchy fingers. Of course such policies are entirely up to you and how you want to run things. Make sure your members know up front though.

Often they will beg and plead and try to go to one officer to the next to try and garner a reprieve. You need to be firm, fair and consistent in dealing with people who don’t fit and consulting with your officer team is a sure fire way of doing this.

Managing your guild. Getting more information
We mentioned above a lot of theory and advice on how to be a better guild and guild leader and also how to invite, promote and kick your members. GW2 also provides lots of other information as to the state of your guild. You can find these on the Guild Tab (G in game). They should be self-explanatory.

The Initial Roster screen(when you first press G)

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Guild Influence History Panel

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Part Three of this series will look at the influence system in some detail.

Guild History Panel

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Guild Registrar
In each races' capital city and Lions Arch there is an NPC that serves as a Guild’s Registrar. You can use them to raise the guild cap and once you have enough influence obtain a guild emblem.

If you are going to raise your guild’s cap, it’s a good idea to schedule in advance to make sure you have enough people online to meet the criteria, especially if you are a multi time zone guild.

By far and away the easiest place to find a Guild Registrar is Hoelbrak. They do exist in other cities, but due to the design of them they are hard to find, especially as the Directions NPC doesn’t always know where they are (looking at you, Divinity's Reach). I've included the locations of all the Guild Registrars in each race's capital city:Summary
The topic of Guild Management is a huge one and even this long article cant hope to cover every possibility. If I had to give one piece of advice it would be that behind every name on your roster is real person with feelings, aspirations and a desire to feel part of something greater. They chose your guild from thousands of others to join in the same way as you chose to start a guild to be unique from the thousands of others. Act with respect and integrity and you’ll find your guild grows both in numbers and in feeling of a great place to be. Because that’s what makes a great guild, not the accomplishments, winning or losing but the people who have chosen to be in it with you.
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#2 Truemas

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 05:47 PM

Simply: Great! Things like this i learn in my study, i even read the same book ( well , ok , a part of it), and what i can say is: if someone really gives it a try ti read ( and understand ) this post, this person is closer to understanding people in general and more precisely why such stuff is so important in every social structure. I also agree with the leader (and officers) be (being) the most important part. If you have a power/prestige hungry leader, the guild is doomed to fall. Getting capable staff is the most difficult but important thing.
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#3 Lady Elvea

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 06:06 PM

I feel like the Mouth of Shanron commenting, but... great post, very well thought through. Thanks for sharing!

[goes off to stage a coup]


;)
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#4 Dove

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 08:45 PM

Love your author suggestions. Covey, Carnegie, and Maxwell are stellar. I would add to that Jim Collins, of [i]Good to Great [/i]fame regarding successful organizations.
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#5 TheDazzler

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 09:48 PM

I would suggest that merely asking to be an officer should not remove someone from consideration for the position.

Ask someone why they want the role. If it's for reasons other than wanting to help, play a more active role, or be in a position to teach/lead (not boss people around but inspire to greatness)/organize/mentor THEN respond "I'll think about it" and secretly finish that sentence with "forever".
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#6 Space

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 10:57 PM

a nice read, i'll chuck in my 2 pennies worth.

the 2 most important things i've found in 'successful' guilds are:[list]
[*]have a collective common goal
[*]recruit the right people to achieve that goal
[/list]
sounds simple enough, but so many guilds lose sight of their identity that they end up fragmented. get the recruitment right and a lot of potential stress and issues disappear.

i'm pretty sure this thread will turn into a mass candlelit vigil of guild leaders mourning the loss of all their time spent stressing / bogged down in admin over games :lol:
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#7 Cabal

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 11:16 PM

not sure I agree with (anyone who asks to be officer should be moved to the bottom of the list)

In past games some of my better officers were the ones who were outspoken and stepped up and wanted to be an officer.

Granted I see your point in not all people whom you first meet that want to be officers are candidates for the job.

However i think you should elaborate more
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#8 Tilian

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 01:12 AM

Very good article! Any more of these in the pipes? If so, I'm looking forward to it!
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#9 Arden

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 01:41 AM

Thanks for the thread. In terms of food for thought - this was a feast. Very useful targeting the structural style based around guild-size.
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#10 blakdoxa

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 02:04 AM

Man I love these articles!
I had to learn all this the hard way but I'm sure glad I know it now. :)
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#11 EnyaRaven

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 02:06 AM

[quote]Delegate, delegate, delegate. Not only will it take a whole load of pressure off you, it will give your guild members something to aspire to. [/quote]
I totally disagree with this, using this model you would be classed as a dictator. The method I have been using are the 5 D's

Yes Delegate is one, but its to issue a task.
Defer - the guild or your officers suggest that the project cant be done at this time.
Dump it - It was a stupid idea in the first place.
DO IT - You discussed the pro's & cons and you all decided to start the project.
Deliver - The completion of the task or project.

In this method you all work as a team and you will quickly find out who is officer material.
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#12 Bunzaga

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 04:27 AM

Does anyone know if two guilds can have identical guild tags on the same server? For example, the "Alphabet Guild", and "Already Been Counted" guild both want [ABC]. Is this possible, or are guild tags unique per server?
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#13 shanaeri rynale

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 05:49 AM

[quote name='EnyaRaven' timestamp='1344305175' post='1688619']

I totally disagree with this, using this model you would be classed as a dictator. The method I have been using are the 5 D's

Yes Delegate is one, but its to issue a task.
Defer - the guild or your officers suggest that the project cant be done at this time.
Dump it - It was a stupid idea in the first place.
DO IT - You discussed the pro's & cons and you all decided to start the project.
Deliver - The completion of the task or project.

In this method you all work as a team and you will quickly find out who is officer material.
[/quote]

I agree, there's so only much you can put in into such an article. Those above activities I took as implicit as a subset of the overall delegation task. The biggest step is learning to let go in the first place hence the emphasis :)
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#14 souslade

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 08:04 AM

[quote name='shanaeri rynale' timestamp='1344271377' post='1686286']Act with respect and integrity and you’ll find your guild grows both in numbers and in feeling of a great place to be. Because that’s what makes a great guild, not the accomplishments, winning or losing but the people who have chosen to be in it with you.[/quote]

Great post! I remember trying to form GW1 guilds with large groups of people several times with no success, people eventually just leave no matter how nice you've treated them. This article explains it all, it's the aspiration and integrity of a group that drives and forms the basis of a community, and this is why guilds are called "Guilds" and not "Committee", less is more...
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#15 XgreatArtist

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 08:27 AM

well done
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#16 MikeT

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 11:03 AM

excellent!
very educating and a good read. I learned quite something.
Particularly the part about leadership.

Thank you, shanaeri rynale!
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#17 Ankeus

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 12:20 PM

I think the most important aspect of all is the goal of the guild. The best guilds I've been in were (pvp) guilds with clear objectives and we tried to reach those objectives every day and with team play. The worst guilds I've been in were PvE guilds with no goals (read nothing to do). What's the point of being in guild if you solo play always? Destiny's Edge didn't solo.
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#18 TheHidden01

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 12:38 PM

Leadership and guilds are wonderful things. There can be a million different ways and each can work. I have always been fascinated by the way guilds work and how they are managed.

Throwing some extra tips out there I'd say the following:-

1) VALUE THE PEOPLE, how under-rated this has become in some guilds is shocking.
2) Trust in your advisors but also trust your own vision.
3) Treat each member equally and fairly, overcome intimidation by bigger personalities.
4) Not often said but put your members first, not the outside community. This is controversial for some, but critical for us for the past six years.
5) Build a culture, and honour your history. It adds depth and uniqueness.

I could, and many could add a million more, but I wanted to throw some abstract thoughts in their :P

Good thread ;)

TH

Edited by TheHidden01, 07 August 2012 - 12:39 PM.

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#19 Khalija

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 02:52 PM

[quote name='Bunzaga' timestamp='1344313657' post='1688946']
Does anyone know if two guilds can have identical guild tags on the same server? For example, the "Alphabet Guild", and "Already Been Counted" guild both want [ABC]. Is this possible, or are guild tags unique per server?
[/quote]

Both guilds can use [ABC].
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#20 Regyx

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 04:58 PM

I have a bit to add:

I disagree with the whole "The people that ask are the worse to be officer", like many here before have said. Sometimes it's those people that turn out to be great guild leaders. Not everyone has bad intentions (maybe the writer has had very bad experience in the past). Also, it helps that they're willingly going to take the spot and not by "a feeling of force" so to speak where the person feels obliged to; in which case can lead to a very bad officer that only has a title but no responsibilities.

Also, the
[quote][b][size=5]Tips and Hints for Guild Leaders[/size][/b][list]
[*]Delegate, delegate, delegate. Not only will it take a whole load of pressure off you, it will give your guild members something to aspire to. Treat every new guild member as though they could be your next officer and your next officer as a potential guild leader. That’s right, aim to train yourself out of a job. Also, ensure there is no over-reliance on any one person, be that for doing events or paying the bills.
[*]Promote because of character, not of ability or because they are your best friend. A bad officer can ruin a guild in no time, so choose them carefully. Personally I never promote someone who asks me to be an officer. As soon as they do, they go to the bottom of my list.
[*]You MUST be the most active or very close to it in your guild. As a guild leader you cannot expect any growth in your guild if you're not active. People will get discouraged quickly with a guild where the leader has weeks since logged on time consistently. When you do go on vacation, let guildies know when you’ll be back and who you left in charge in the meantime
[*]You must promote activity like crazy. Even when no one else is talking, you may often times be forced to talk to yourself (but not too often). But if you want to build the community amongst your members, you have to be the one to instigate it at the very start unless you're lucky to find those special members that do it for you. Try to encourage people to run their own events, and make them feel like doing so.
[*]Don't expect to have much time for yourself. You exist for the guild, not them for you. Of course the more you delegate and train members, the easier your life will become.
[*]Have, at minimum, a loosely defined objective or, at best, a well-defined objective. Having a well-defined objective for your guild will let recruits know what your guild is about. It will also help in the recruiting process. Most people are looking for something in a guild, and if you can fulfill that something they will want to join you, and if you don't fulfill that something, it helps keep disgruntled members from ever joining your guild in the first place.
[*]Keep your roster up to date. Having a long list of inactive members can be subtly discouraging to your members who are active, especially if those who are active are few in numbers.
[*]Use the many communication tools available to you! A guild with a website, mumble/teamspeak/ventrillo server and a forum has that much more opportunity to stay in touch with its members and grow as a community, of gamers and friends.
[*]As your guild grows, keep a decent ratio of officers to guild members. Try to space out your officers online times to fit the member online times. Having any given officer online at any given time a member is on can help tremendously with activity, and overall member morale.
[*]Be organized. In everything that you do, be organized about it. Guild events that go poorly because of bad organization is one of the quickest ways to lose members, especially in Guild Wars 2, because guild hopping is so easy. Even if it wasn't the best experience, if it was well organized people have hope for the next time.
[*]Be humble. Welcome advice, suggestions and comments from members and be willing to use them. Your members are there for you just as much as you are there for your members. Most people like to give input to their guild if they care about it. So be open to suggestions and ask for them often. Also don’t forget to give credit where it’s due.
[*]Settle disputes quickly. Disputes amongst guild members must be dealt with swiftly in order to create harmony within the guild. There's nothing worse than a long drawn out fight amongst guild members that can cause splits and lost members, even those not involved.
[*]Finally, set a good example. How you play the game, the things you say, the things you do, will set the tone for the guild on the whole. So, if you're a jerk, often times the guild will become a group of jerks and those that are'nt will generally leave. If you're a considerate nice person, the guild will become a group of considerate nice people, and those that are jerks will either leave or get booted quickly. You will attract and keep like-minded people. For example, it’s unlikely you’ll be able to keep a hard core PvP’er happy if you are a casual, part time PvE player and Guild.
[/list]
[/quote]
I read something like that somewhere else before. In fact, I bet just by googling "Guild Leader Tips" or some sort of related topic, you'll find a very similar article where this might have been taken from.

And
You shouldn't always treat people "Equally", this will give a sense of no "progression". It's better to give or talk more w/ officers because it helps promote hard work-> Effort, but also don't do over do it because this might cause over justification (It causes people to stop trying at something because they receive a reward, wierd but true). Willingly or not, this is usually an easy part to do, it comes naturally to many of us.

Also, a good thing to do is "Don't talk to the character, talk to the person" , like the article said many of us forget that there are people behind it and sometimes we fail to value those people. It's happen to me and I've seen many situations where this happens.

Another thing I feel to add is to ... well actually make people do things for you. In the article it said "You for the guild, not them for you" While this is true in the long run, in the short while those players seeking to help out or become part of the community might feel a bit unnecessary. It's a good idea to make them help you achieve a common goal or make the person feel needed, after all the worst is being invisible in your own community. Of course, some people are just ok with that but don't be a push over as a guild leader , it'll foster a perception of the guild entirely.

Lastly, great read. All the basic and important rules are there and so far so good. Although I do wonder, why maybe not cover the "Three Branches of Government". I can't remember the author of who was giving good examples of leading/managing countries but he covered the form by which US runs, Dictatorship, and another form. It was a while since I've read it but still pretty interesting ideas.
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#21 shanaeri rynale

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 06:06 PM

The 'never promote a player who asks to be an officer' is more my own personal rule. I have tended to find that people who ask for something tend to have a sense of entitlement not of service to the whole. Giving a promotion to someone who asks for it, leaves the door open for others to ask too. So and so asked and got promoted, I've been here longer and did way more than them, so how come I didnt get picked *rage rage* etc. Therefore in my mind it's always better to choose humble players who are doing the job already rather than anyone with the slightist hint of entitlement. As I said, it's a personal view and entirely up to you :)

Yeah a lot of the tips I used came from material I used to use to train my Alliance Guild leaders back in 2006 and posted to the old Guru a couple of times. I guess it seems familar because lists like (not just from me) it have been going the rounds for years :). Still good advice though imho

In terms of treating people equally it was more to do without showing favoritsm because of their position in say a dispute. In general, I try to make sure I have time for both officers and members(so that it reduces the risk of a clique but in my mind a member and an officer are of equal value, except they have different roles and responisbilities). So while you should develop an inner circle if you are larger Guild, in my view your play time should not be exclusive to just them. To quote some John Maxwell. He(Maxwell) posits that as you rise in leadership your responsibilities increase and rights decrease. This is, as he describes it, the true cost of leadership. He states that if you are to lead well then there are four things you need to know about the Law of Sacrifice:[list=1]
[*][b]There Is No Success Without Sacrifice[/b] – Every person who has achieved any success in life has made sacrifices to do so. Effective leaders sacrifice much that is good in order to dedicate themselves to what is best.
[*][b]Leaders Are Often Asked to Give Up More Than Others[/b] – The heart of leadership to putting others ahead of yourself. It’s doing what is best for the team. For that reason, leaders have to give up their rights. The cost of leadership: Leaders must be willing to give up more than the people they lead. Leadership means sacrifice.
[*][b]You Must Keep Giving Up to Stay Up[/b] – Leadership success requires continual change, constant improvement, and on-going sacrifice.
[*][b]The Higher the Level of Leadership, the Greater the Sacrifice[/b] – The higher you go, the more it’s going to cost you. And it doesn’t matter what kind of leadership career you pick. You will have to make sacrifices. You will have to give up to go up
[/list]
I tried to keep the article grounded in Guildwars, rather than focus on the throny and emotive topic of what form of government suits best(never mix politics and gaming) .

In the end, there are as many Guild types as they are Guilds so in my view it was best to give people some basic pointers and leave the rest to their own private study and choice.
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#22 Iron Legionnaire

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 09:23 PM

Wow, this is great.
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#23 TheHidden01

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 02:20 AM

The idea of asking to be a leader is a difficult one. I agree to a degree that asking for leadership isn't a good sign but it really depends on the situation and context they ask for leadership.

One of the most unique challenges I have faced is that with such a stable leadership it can often lead to people satisfied and therefore not as motivated to take the initiative. Now when issues arise, or times are difficult as every guild must face, often quiet members who have been loyal for years suddenly fill that need without being asked. It is then I find myself wondering, are the quiet members of today hidden talents to unlock, or just quiet members. If they aren't stepping up now, should I really push the matter, or does a gentle push give us a massive boost?

When situations arise, when a role is needed sometimes, someone can say, hey man, give me a chance I'll take care of it. I'm more than happy to give someone a chance, I'm a confident person, I know what I'm looking for, and I make sure they understand our expectations. If they run with the ball, then they can do more and hold that position, if they don't, then maybe another time.

I guess it really comes down to who is asking, and their history with you. If it's an honest member that has been loyal, done what they can and a humble presence then give them a chance I say. If it's a new recruit, an ambitious member, or someone who is quite happy to cut corners, proceed with caution. Remember though, leaders like this are not inherently bad.

Good officers with clear headed advice will help in these situations.

TH

Edited by TheHidden01, 08 August 2012 - 02:22 AM.

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#24 Slashiroth

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 04:06 AM

Epic two-part guide to creating a sustainable guild and being a proper leader. This is great stuff.
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@Slashiroth

Still...not...80...T...T


#25 tallanx

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 05:59 AM

I used to read this novel series called the Farseer Trilogy, and one of the kingdoms called their leader the "Sacrifice". I've always felt that if you want to be a leader that was a good way to think of yourself.
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#26 Lord Sojar

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 07:09 AM

Nice guide Shanaeri.

I'd also add that having long time friends as officers is generally a good idea, at least from my perspective. True friends are those with like minds and if you're an organized person, you surround yourself with friends that bolster your own abilities and fill in your personal deficits. That's how I always ran my guild(s), and it worked beautifully. Building a new trusting relationship with a person, especially over an electronic medium is difficult, and it took several years to cultivate my e-friendships with a very select group of people, who I can generally count on 1, maybe 2, hands.
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#27 Mr_Finesse

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 09:47 PM

First off, great set of articles so far. This is all extremely helpful information to both aspiring guild leaders as well as guild leaders who need a refresher.

Secondly, I'm having self-inflicted issues deciding what server to tell my guys to get on. I've been stalking gw2guilds.org like a madman figuring out if a server a.) is going to be too full based on the guilds that have stated they are going to be there and b.) which server fits with what my guild is trying to do (as you mentioned in the article).

The main question I have, is should I be overly concerned with finding a medium population server to put my guild on? The guild itself is under 20 people, but I just don't want to make them all rush into buying the game so that they can all get on the server I pick. So far, i'm highly attracted to a server that has 68 registered guilds 0_o

Thoughts? Should I be overly concerned about the population of the server to get 20 friends on?

Thanks!
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#28 dawnq

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 10:14 PM

I would say it depends.

First - no one knows the launch number caps, we can only guess.
Second - No one (not us atleast) can predict how many people will join said servers that are not preregistered on a site like gW2guilds.org
Third - Will all 20 be able to log in and sign up? Are the 20 willing to pay for server transfer if all are unable to join server?
That being said I expect things to be like this

Low = medium
Medium = high
High = full

Full= overflow going into the high mediums thus making them Full.

Edited by dawnq, 08 August 2012 - 10:16 PM.

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#29 Kahluah

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 03:19 AM

Fantastic guide - really got a lot out of the series of articles, this one in particular. Trying to start my own guild at the moment, so this has really helped set things in my head as to what I'm doing and where am going with it. Thanks very much for putting this up!
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#30 Araliun

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Posted 13 August 2012 - 08:17 PM

You know, you have done a tremendous service for the GW community in posting this information. While leadership styles and visions may be different - you put forth the time and made the effort of bringing all of this to bear.

Thank you.
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