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Too many Kickstarter projects!


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#1 Klaleara

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 03:56 PM

I never thought I'd say this, but there are too many now days.  There are a lot of REALLY cool projects out there that aren't even getting close to being funded now, simply because there are too many projects.

It is making me sad, I wish I could pledge for them all, but everyones pledge money is being spread too thin, and no projects are getting funded.  Maybe Kickstarter should start limiting the large pledge projects at one time.  

Thoughts?

#2 FoxBat

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 05:29 PM

If Kickstarter themselves starts limiting like this, other sites doing the same thing will spring up to fill the void. That's not a viable option. It's an open competitive market, when oversuscribed few get anything, that's how it goes. Much like the game industry in general right now.

The whole thing is rife with abuse really. If crowdfunding is supposed to be the future, I'd prefer a version that involved some more safeguards and guarantees that your money isn't being flushed down the shitter. Some kind of accountability for bad kickstarts is essential.

Edited by FoxBat, 15 November 2012 - 05:30 PM.


#3 Klaleara

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 06:10 PM

Honestly I'm more worried about (And already seeing it) companies who have already been successful, and don't need the Kickstart, basically not even bother starting a project unless it gets funded.  (AKA Project Eternity, Mindless Self Indulgence, etc)

#4 Ualtar

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 11:01 AM

The whole crowdsourcing idea scares me.  It is a good idea if you have spare money that you don't care about.  For the average person I think it is a big risk.  You are throwing money at somebody you don't know hoping they will give you something back.  It is one thing to do something like that if you are investing in stocks, but for a game it is odd.  People give hundreds of dollars on a idea that they will never make money back on.  I don't get it.

#5 jirayasan

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 12:15 AM

They're all over the place. Though some of them are getting alot of support.

#6 madmaxII

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 05:47 AM

View PostUaltar, on 16 November 2012 - 11:01 AM, said:

The whole crowdsourcing idea scares me.  It is a good idea if you have spare money that you don't care about.  For the average person I think it is a big risk.  You are throwing money at somebody you don't know hoping they will give you something back.  It is one thing to do something like that if you are investing in stocks, but for a game it is odd.  People give hundreds of dollars on a idea that they will never make money back on.  I don't get it.

That's a very negative way to look at it. Of course the kickstarter system can be abused. There are always black sheep. On the other hand it also gives people who couldn't afford developing their own game the chance to do so. You may lose your money but you may also get a game that is much closer to your "perfect" game than the one an established company would develop. That's why it is worth taking the risk of losing your money if you see a concept that you really like to play once it is finished - at least in my opinion.

#7 Guild of Choice

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 08:05 AM

View PostmadmaxII, on 18 November 2012 - 05:47 AM, said:

That's a very negative way to look at it. Of course the kickstarter system can be abused. There are always black sheep. On the other hand it also gives people who couldn't afford developing their own game the chance to do so. You may lose your money but you may also get a game that is much closer to your "perfect" game than the one an established company would develop. That's why it is worth taking the risk of losing your money if you see a concept that you really like to play once it is finished - at least in my opinion.

Agreed. Yes it's not for everyone - not everyone has disposable income - but think of it as using the public as venture capitalists. Anyone who pledges money towards the project is investing in the sort of game they'd want to play or supporting the kind of industry or genre they'd like to see back in business. This explains why a lot of ex-Sierra adventure game developers for example are getting back into it (e.g. Leisure Suit Larry: Reloaded, Jane Jensen's Moebius, SpaceVenture and Hero-U: Rogue to Redemption). There are a lot of adventure game fans out there that want to see this kind of game back under the radar that publishers would normally not touch because they deem a few hundred thousand units not enough profit. Hence why FPSs have been pumped out like there's no tomorrow. Large publishers want to play it safe and not take risks and this has stifled innovation in the gaming industry. Kickstarters (and indie games in general) are a way of getting around that.

That's not to say I don't like games from the big publishers like EA, Valve, Bethesda Softworks, 2K Games and NCSoft - but there's only a few games that I really deem worthwhile.

Oh and while I'm on the topic, that's kind of why I like Guild Wars 2 and ArenaNet. ArenaNet were brave enough to try something different in the MMORPG genre, twice. It's rare to find developers/publishers that are willing to take the risks and not just pump out clones (it would've been easier to just pump out a WoW clone for example...)




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