Jump to content

  • Curse Sites
Help
- - - - -

[Results] Guild Wars 2 Research


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Gazzy

Gazzy

    Fahrar Cub

  • Members
  • 24 posts
  • Location:WEST COAST BEST COAST
  • Server:Stormbluff Isle

Posted 25 November 2012 - 05:22 AM

Hey everyone!

You may remember the research from these threads:
http://www.guildwars...er-gather-here/
http://www.guildwars...arch-revisited/

Well I'm back with results! This initial study was only focusing on player personality and character personality, so that's what the numbers are about. Chi-squared and 2-tailed t-tests were used to get these numbers. Here you go!

Final Sample Size: 898 [retained participants who specified their gender and could remember the initial personality they picked.]



The sample surveyed scored slightly differently than the average population on the TIPI measurements. Average population compared to the current sample in the following ways, respectively: Openness 5.38 vs. 5.31; Conscientiousness 5.40 vs. 4.87; Extroversion 4.44 vs. 3.35; Agreeableness 5.23 vs. 4.61; Emotional Stability 4.83 vs. 5.10.

Big Five & Initial Personality
·    Players who start ferocious characters have higher normalized extroversion scores than players who do not start ferocious characters on average: .19 versus -.04, t(167)= 2.8, p<.01.
·    Players who start ferocious characters have lower normalized agreeableness scores than players who do not start ferocious characters on average: -.19 versus .04, t(167)= 3.16, p<.005.
·    Players who start dignified characters have lower normalized openness to new experiences scores than players who do not start dignified characters on average: -.09 versus .06, t(384)= 2.15, p<.05.
·    Players who start dignified characters have lower normalized extroversion scores than players who do not start dignified characters on average: -.1 versus .07, t(384)= 2.75, p<.01.
·    Players who start dignified characters have higher normalized emotional stability scores than players who do not start dignified characters on average: .08 versus -.06, t(384)= 2.22, p<.05.
·    Players who start charming characters have higher normalized agreeableness scores than players who do not start charming characters on average: .11 versus -.07, t(344)= 2.35, p<.05.
·    Players who start charming characters have lower normalized emotional stability scores than players who do not start charming characters on average: -.11 versus .07, t(344)= 2.55, p<.01.

Gender Differences & Initial Personality
·    Male players who start ferocious characters have higher normalized extroversion scores than male players who do not start ferocious characters on average: 0.19 versus -.05, t(150)= 2.63, p<.01.
·    Male players who start ferocious characters have lower normalized agreeableness scores than male players who do not start ferocious characters on average: -.14 versus .03, t(150)= 2.01, p<.05.
·    Male players who start dignified characters have lower normalized openness to new experiences scores than male players who do not start dignified characters on average: -.09 versus .06, t(325)= 2.07, p<.05.
·    Male players who start dignified characters have lower normalized extroversion scores than male players who do not start dignified characters on average: -.09 versus .07, t(325)= 2.07, p<.05.
·    Male players who start charming characters have lower normalized emotional stability scores than male players who do not start charming characters on average: -.11 versus .06, t(264)= 2.16, p<.05.
·    Female players who start dignified characters have lower normalized extroversion scores than female players who do not start dignified characters on average: -.22 versus .13, t(58)= 2.11, p<.05.

Gender Preferences & Initial Personality
·    20% of male players start a ferocious character, 11% of female players start a ferocious character. 19% of the sample is ferocious.
·    Male players are more likely than female players to start a ferocious character, 20% versus 11%, c2(898) = 6.15, p<.01.
·    No significant gender differences were found between male and female players creating dignified characters.
·    36% of male players start a charming character, 51% of female players start a charming character. 38% of the sample started charming avatars.
·    Female players are more likely than male players to start charming character, 51% versus 36%, c2(898) = 8.13, p<.001.

Gender Avatar Extension
·    38% of male players consider their avatar an extension of themselves, 42% of female players consider their avatar an extension of themselves. 39% of the sample considered their avatar an extension of themselves.

o   There is no difference between male and female players considering their avatar an extension of themselves.


Avatar as an Extension vs. not Extension & Personality
·    Players who consider their avatar an extension of themselves and started ferocious characters have lower normalized agreeableness scores than players who do not consider their avatar an extension of themselves on average: -.28 versus .13, t(52)=2.5, p<.05.
·    Players who consider their avatar an extension of themselves and started charming characters have higher normalized agreeableness scores than players who do not consider their avatar an extension of themselves on average: .29 versus -.16, t(120)=4.1, p<.001.

Extremized Personalities
·    59% of players played an extremized version of one of the three basic personality types (ferocious = barbaric; dignified = noble, captivating = charismatic) at the time of data collection.
·    The personality selected at creation for ferocious, dignified, and charming characters significantly predicted the likelihood that a character would have this basic personality as a part of their personality later in gameplay.
·    88% of players who created a ferocious character continued to play a ferocious character at the time of data collection.

o   Of this 88%, 51% were extremized versions of the ferocious personality (barbaric).

·    78% of players who created a dignified character continued to play a dignified character at the time of data collection.

o   Of this 78%, 59% were extremized versions of the dignified personality (noble).

·    91% of players who created a charming character continued to play a charming character at the time of data collection.

o   Of this 91%, 61% were extremized versions of the charming personality (captivating).


Extremized Personality vs. Mild Personality
·    Players who play extremely ferocious (barbaric) characters (>75% ferocity) have lower have lower normalized agreeableness scores than players who play moderately ferocious characters: -.17 versus .30, t(52)= 2.75, p<.01.

Extremized Personality vs. Extremized Personality
·    Players who play extremely ferocious (barbaric) characters (>75% ferocity) have lower normalized agreeableness scores than players who play extremized dignified (noble) or extremized charming (captivating) characters: -.29 versus .07, t(97)= 3.61, p<.001.
·    Players who play extremely charming (captivating) characters (>75% charm) have higher normalized agreeableness scores than players who play extremized dignified (noble) or extremized ferocious (barbaric) characters: .18 versus -0.13, t(222)= 3.38, p<.001.

Avatar an Extension of Self at Creation and Now
·    Players who consider their avatar an extension of themselves and started ferocious characters have lower normalized agreeableness scores than players who consider their avatar an extension of themselves but do not create ferocious characters: -.56 versus .10, t(52)=5.0, p<.001.
·    Players who consider their avatar an extension of themselves and currently play ferocious characters have lower normalized agreeableness scores than players who consider their avatar an extension of themselves but do not currently play a ferocious character on average: -.48 versus .10, t(60)=4.6, p<.001.
·    Players who consider their avatar an extension of themselves and created dignified characters have lower normalized extroversion scores than players who consider their avatar an extension of themselves but did not create a dignified character on average: -.12 versus .12, t(171)=2.3, p<.05.
·    Players who consider their avatar an extension of themselves and started charming characters have higher normalized agreeableness scores than players who consider their avatar an extension of themselves but do not create charming characters: .29 versus -.16, t(120)=4.02, p<.001.
·    Players who consider their avatar an extension of themselves and currently play charming characters have higher normalized agreeableness scores than players who consider their avatar an extension of themselves but do not currently play a charming character on average: .3 versus -.18, t(131)=4.48, p<.001.

Avatar Not an Extension of Self at Creation and Now
·    Players who do not consider their avatar an extension of themselves and started dignified characters have higher normalized emotional stability scores than players who do not consider their avatar an extension of themselves and do not create dignified characters: .13 versus -.08, t(212)=2.36; p<.05.
·    Players who do not consider their avatar an extension of themselves and started charming characters have lower normalized emotional stability scores than players who do not consider their avatar an extension of themselves and do not create charming characters: -.17 versus .11, t(223)=3.22; p<.01.
·    Players who do not consider their avatar an extension of themselves and are currently playing charming characters have lower normalized emotional stability scores than players who do not consider their avatar an extension of themselves and do not currently play charming characters: -.13 versus .09, t(232)=2.54; p<.05.

Edited by Gazzy, 25 November 2012 - 05:25 AM.


#2 SevereEpicz

SevereEpicz

    Asuran Acolyte

  • Members
  • 119 posts

Posted 25 November 2012 - 05:34 AM

i dont get it :)

#3 AiponGkooja

AiponGkooja

    Vanguard Scout

  • Members
  • 353 posts

Posted 25 November 2012 - 05:42 AM

I think the biggest takeaway is that people who take gw2 personality surveys are less emotionally stable than the general population. :-P

#4 Dasryn

Dasryn

    Seraph Guardian

  • Members
  • 1570 posts
  • Location:USA (GMT -5)
  • Profession:Thief
  • Guild Tag:[Myth]
  • Server:Tarnished Coast

Posted 25 November 2012 - 03:21 PM

i actually participated in this survey and i was very interested in the form of the questions.

the results are a bit confusing but its an interesting read if you sit down and  break it down.

good job, thank you.

#5 Mustache Mayhem

Mustache Mayhem

    Seraph Guardian

  • Members
  • 1049 posts

Posted 25 November 2012 - 03:29 PM

haha your avatar says it all =]




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users