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The main game is good, however what about the social aspect?


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#1 Silock

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Posted 14 April 2013 - 10:22 AM

So what is there to do if you fancy just hanging out with friends in the game, aside from of course just sitting around and talking? Are their any good RP novelties we can use such as sitting on chairs, drinking animations, a large range of emotes and other such things like this?  It may sound daft but a lot about an mmo for me is not simply the fighting and crafting, it's a games social aspect to that is equally as important to me.

So what things are there to do that doesn't simply involve fighting and crafting, what social down time activities are there?

Thanks guys :)

#2 Rinaldo

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 01:39 AM

Social? :surprised:
I did not see any social in GW2 ...yet.

#3 Trei

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 02:20 AM

View PostSilock, on 14 April 2013 - 10:22 AM, said:

So what is there to do if you fancy just hanging out with friends in the game, aside from of course just sitting around and talking? Are their any good RP novelties we can use such as sitting on chairs, drinking animations, a large range of emotes and other such things like this?  It may sound daft but a lot about an mmo for me is not simply the fighting and crafting, it's a games social aspect to that is equally as important to me.....
I agree.

Unfortunately, if we are to use this yardstick alone, then GW2... Isn't much of an MMO.

Emotes are lacking, so are character interaction with the environmental set pieces.
No private custom chat channels...

But I believe anet knows this and will get to it once more pressing issues are settled.

#4 Kurosov

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 03:01 AM

Most of the emotes from gw1 are technically in, they just don't have animations.  Typing one such as /doubletake doesn't give you the no such emote message but also doesn't kick off an animation. Mostly likely they were planned yet incomplete.

Drinking has animations but only with environmental drink items.

Keg brawl is a good example of the kinds of social interaction that was planned to be added. It just seems like the game was released before most of them were complete.

#5 Roan Rivers

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 05:17 AM

They got those carnival games in Divinity's Reach that they still have not turned on.  Pretty darn sure they are adding at least the shooting range and a bar brawl minigame at some point, they got NPCs yelling out the location but nothing particular happens when you get there.

They also need to decide what they are going to do with guilds and if they are going to have guild halls.  The last "Guild Halls" felt more like strategic defence points rather than homes or places you'd make a guild HQ.

#6 Verranicus

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 08:32 PM

Before you rubes start saying GW2 has no social aspect, try visiting one of the two unofficial RP servers. Plenty of socializing going on there with tight knit communities.

#7 El Duderino

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 09:41 PM

I do love to use the /emote option in chat. It doesn't provide any animations, but it does allow allow you to emote an action.

/emote thinks you should use the /emote option.

:El Duderino thinks you should use the /emote option.

:)

Edited by El Duderino, 16 April 2013 - 09:42 PM.


#8 El Duderino

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 10:53 PM

I wandered past this post at MMORPG.com and thought of this thread. The OP should check it out as it refers to modern MMORPG's in general.

http://www.mmorpg.co...ing-and-DD.html

Quote

Tingle's Touchy Subjects: Roleplaying and D&D

While the genre still doggedly sticks to the acronym MMORPG, that last bit, Role Playing Game, seems to be stretched further and further away from the descriptive mark. Newer online games tend to ask less of players, whether this is through character building or actual RPing, and now rolling a new avatar in whichever fantasyland is nothing more than choosing what abilities you might use to dispatch enemies.


It seems as though, in a bid to widen the audience net, those original nods and winks towards Dungeons and Dragons, and other pen-and-paper experiences, have disappeared. While games such as Ultima and EverQuest found genesis in table top pursuits, newer games are built upon the existing framework put in place by Sony, Origin, and now Blizzard, and not on their influences; we're getting further and further away from where the genre originally started, and further away from a sense of fantasy and personification - and it's hard to know if this is a good thing.
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Origin Story
Coming from a small, ex-industrial town somewhere in Northern England, fantasy isn't exactly within the common vernacular. People "phwoar" at car parts with the same aplomb they might at a buxom women, while anything even approaching, what may be termed as, "nerd culture" is relegated to lost and stranded Pokemon Cards, and perhaps a Beano comic (established some 75 years previous).
Outside of videogames, getting anything that steps outside of the mainstream of fantasy films and Twilight is particularly hard. There are one or two outlets scattered amongst the northern scenery that offer graphic novels and pen and paper RPGs, but to the outsider they look scary, foreign, and probably filled with murderous bearded folk dressed in robes and silk finery.

So with the above explained, it stands to reason that last night was the first time I had ever played Dungeons & Dragons. Browsing Amazon.com a few days earlier, a red box edition of the game was randomly recommended to me, as the website will do from time to time. Feeling flush with cash and with a lingering idea that my favourite pastime of MMOing owes Wizards of the Coast a small debt, I decided to throw caution to the wind, dust off a plastic short sword I had laying around, and thrust it into the air in victory. And then I entered my credit card details.


My own perception of D&D is admittedly somewhere lost within the Simpsons "we played Dungeons and Dragons for 3 hours...then I was slain by an elf" and a general air that you have to pretend to be Gorlock the Huge in front of likewise individuals. The mythos of the game has grown bigger than its own description. When you ask somebody what it is, people generally will invoke The Big Bang Theory, or describe how you, equipped with a toilet roll cardboard wand, will crash and clank throughout a house dispatching imaginary goblins and wooing fictional princesses.

My own, first-hand, experience was a lot different. Wading through the compact player and dungeon masters guides, I managed to roll characters for me and a handful of friends. We sat down, beer in hand, treats in bowls, and proceeded to have one of the most hilarious experiences I've ever had over a 3 hour period.


Instead of transcending reality and opening up a portal to a fantasy world somewhere near the Doritos, we all stayed firmly within the kitchen and at the table. Scenarios were read out from the "Choose your own adventure" style text, and, as dungeon master, I was allowed to riff on certain situations.

By the end of the night, instead of raiding a tomb for an elven warrior's missing sword, the three players had managed to rob a travelling merchant, murder said elven warrior for "that long sword they had", fight and bully each other, knock each other unconscious, lose all of their equipment, and have one of their party hung for the murder of said merchant.
We probably strayed from the rules, and perhaps subverted what is your average D&D adventure, but the heart of the experience was there. And we, collectively, loved every minute of it.

Digital Application
So after my tumble with dice and character sheets, it got me thinking. The organic and relative freedom of playing D&D was what made it such an enjoyable experience. We didn't roleplay as such, but like reading a novel, each player had started to paint an imagine in their mind. The scenarios and conversations started strained, but ended with tears of laughter, much guffawing, and truly memorable, and dare I say, physical experiences.


Applied to my own MMORPG history, and I believe I can find similar tales. When playing earlier online games, I did believe the setting more. Perhaps it was because of my age, or because the structures of quests and linear storytelling weren't quite so omnipotent. The world was full of creatures with which to grind, but largely the reason to do so was left to you.

With recent advancements, the genre seems to have left behind that element, or at least illusion, of choice. If EverQuest's initial creators Brad McQuaid and Steve Clover were inspired by their pen-and-paper adventures, the same cannot be said of modern developers.

Newer MMORPGs play more like linear books. If you choose to follow the story, each area has a set of clandestine criteria to fill. The choice is never yours to take, and mostly the actions are simply kill or collect. There is no dungeon master to ask whether you might parlay with bandits in the Dead Mines, or at the very least deviate from a charge from the entrance to the exit.


In the last Touchy Subject, I discussed the lack of community and social within the genre, and how it affects the longevity of a title. I think the element of roleplay, or at least feeling the pangs of character is also key. I look at my time in EverQuest and see a definite story arc. I see the lower level character scrabbling around, fishing for rubies, exploring the land, and forging armour for friends and customers. I look to my time in The Old Republic and see 12 carbon copies of myself bunny hoping to markers on a map.

Do you feel there are still RPG elements within the genre? Are you still as mesmerised by the fantasy created by developers? Or do you yearn for a time when pen-and-paper influences were more pronounced, and character and choice was valued? Let me know in the comments below.


#9 Loperdos

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 11:17 PM

View PostEl Duderino, on 16 April 2013 - 10:53 PM, said:

I wandered past this post at MMORPG.com and thought of this thread. The OP should check it out as it refers to modern MMORPG's in general.

http://www.mmorpg.co...ing-and-DD.html

In response to the article and the OP, I would say that there is something lacking in the more recent MMOs that I've played, especially in regards to both the RPGing and the social interaction.

The last MMO that I played that actually had any sort of social interaction or RPing on a consistent (and "laid back" basis, insofar as that if a person wanted to participate, they could, but there was no penalty or stigma if one chose not to) basis was LOTRO.  I think the reason for this is two-fold (at least) in nature.

The first has more to do with the more recent game-play styles of MMOs and the shift in the combat system (which I'm pretty sure has been discussed here on more than one occasion).  Take the combat of TERA or rumors of how ESO is going to be, as well as GW2 to an extent and compare them to WoW or LOTRO.  In WoW and LOTRO, even in the midst of raids and other types of fights, you still had some time to type-chat to others and interact that way.  In open world it was even more so because it took so much less attention that talking in the map chat (or whatever the equivalent was for the game) was easy and doable.  Compare this to TERA, ESO (rumored, of course) and GW2.  Even in open world combat (though its a lot easier than any other form of combat) you are more active in your combat via dodges, positioning or what have you.  This reduces the ability to type-chat in the map and interact with those around you because the way the combat system is setup.  As MMOs move more and more towards action oriented combat (which I think is where the genre will head, but what do I know, I'm no expert :P ), I think the ability to type-chat and the perceived social interaction will diminish.

When it comes to the RP community and that sort of social interaction, I think part of it has to do with the lore.  When considering the possibility of joining a RP event or group, it would be commonly perceived that at least a base knowledge of the lore is something that would be highly beneficial to the experience and interaction with other players.  This, I think, is one of the reasons why GW2 has an issue (comparably so with other games with more well known lore) with RPing and that type of social interaction.  The world of Tyria has a fantastic lore and its a great read, but its not one that a lot of the general population of GW2 players know a whole lot about.  Compare this to LOTRO or SWTOR or even WoW where the lore has been around for quite some time (since 1937, 1977 and 1994, respectively).  Unless I'm mistaken, which is completely possible :) , the world of Tyria did not exist before 2005 when GW was released.  If it did exist before then, it was even less well known, and GW brought it out of obscurity.

TL;DR - I think its a combination of the shift in MMOs combat systems combined with the lore stigma when dealing with RP social interactions.

#10 lmaonade

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 09:05 AM

my favorite thing to do with my guild is hang out in the guild hall...

owait

yeah, no the game is still unfinished on the social aspect (and in general) right now, many emotes are in the game but do nothing yet, no guild halls, and I do recall that there were supposed to be casual mini games like carnival type things in major cities, but those obviously do not exist yet.

#11 El Duderino

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 01:07 PM

View Postlmaonade, on 17 April 2013 - 09:05 AM, said:

my favorite thing to do with my guild is hang out in the guild hall...

owait

yeah, no the game is still unfinished on the social aspect (and in general) right now, many emotes are in the game but do nothing yet, no guild halls, and I do recall that there were supposed to be casual mini games like carnival type things in major cities, but those obviously do not exist yet.

I spent hours in our guild hall doing playing 1v1, 2v2, etc PvP or just screwing around. It was the place to hang our and meet before doing a lot of in game stuff. It blows my mind that we don't have guild halls in this game.

#12 Feathermoore

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 03:33 PM

View PostVerranicus, on 15 April 2013 - 08:32 PM, said:

Before you rubes start saying GW2 has no social aspect, try visiting one of the two unofficial RP servers. Plenty of socializing going on there with tight knit communities.

The RP servers, and the community there, are 100% player created. There is nothing in GW2 that promotes social interaction (what the OP is asking about). There are a few areas, the RP servers being the prime example, of healthy communities, but that is not due to the game, but do to projects that the players created.

So, other than RP? There is nothing social in GW2. Currently. I only add that because I know someone will rip my head off if I don't.

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#13 MazingerZ

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 04:17 PM

View PostFeathermoore, on 17 April 2013 - 03:33 PM, said:

The RP servers, and the community there, are 100% player created. There is nothing in GW2 that promotes social interaction (what the OP is asking about). There are a few areas, the RP servers being the prime example, of healthy communities, but that is not due to the game, but do to projects that the players created.

So, other than RP? There is nothing social in GW2. Currently. I only add that because I know someone will rip my head off if I don't.

Seriously, it seems as if they spent most of their budget on the art (and apparently have an overabundant art staff due to the crap hitting the gem store and the events) and almost nothing for actual system support, or their system developers are incompetent.

Implementing something as simple as additional chat channels, or even Coalitions like in CoX should be a no-brainer.  The implementation of a LFG tool, either by hot-joining or simply broadcasting what you want so you don't have to alt-tab out of the game should be simple.  Coming sometime in 2013 just does not cut it.

ArenaNet has done almost nothing to foster this game outside of their revenue streams.
It's okay to enjoy crap if you're willing to admit it's crap.
Every patch is like ArenaNet walking out onto the stage of the International Don't Kitten Up Championship, and then proceeding to shiv itself in the stomach 30 times while screaming "IT'S FOR YOUR OWN GOOD! IT'S FOR YOUR OWN GOOD!"

#14 Gladiator Motoko

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 04:21 PM

I'd say the social aspect is the only aspect GW2 might have going for it that keeps people logging on.

I log on very seldomly to see if there are some old friends that play the game that I haven't spoken with in a while...

But then I realize that they were all smart enough to move away from this inaccurate sequel asap.

#15 Dasryn

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Posted 21 April 2013 - 07:15 AM

i agree with this post that El Duderino posted:

Quote

now rolling a new avatar in whichever fantasyland is nothing more than choosing what abilities you might use to dispatch enemies.

this is happening and GW2 is the pinnacle of this development mentality.

action action action.

notice how when ANet wanted to pay homage to a time in gaming history, they threw back to old 8 bit platformers?

did you guys notice that?

they didnt throwback to pen paper concepts, they didnt throwback to any kind of exploration text type games like Hugo.

they threw back to the most simplistic game design ever.  now im not knocking on our childhood gems and memories, but lets be honest with each other - 8 bit games like mario were shallow.

and i believe that the 8 bit throw back we got was indication that thats where ANet's developmental focus is.  making content accessibly SIMPLE.  5 weapon skills, 4 utilities, a self heal, i mean, its easy to pick up and play, kinda like an old game troller that had start select A and B.

idk, i enjoy GW2 immensely however, i see a trend and idk how to feel about it.

#16 Baron von Scrufflebutt

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Posted 21 April 2013 - 08:42 AM

View PostDasryn, on 21 April 2013 - 07:15 AM, said:

and i believe that the 8 bit throw back we got was indication that thats where ANet's developmental focus is.  making content accessibly SIMPLE.  5 weapon skills, 4 utilities, a self heal, i mean, its easy to pick up and play, kinda like an old game troller that had start select A and B.

Honestly, the problem here is that we are dealing with an MMO. GW2 could have been an amazing 30-hour game. It's a shit 100-hour, let alone a 500-hour or a 1000-hour game.
It's just spread too thin. Action, action, action games can be utterly amazing. For 10 hours. And GW2 is an action, action, action game for 10 hours. But sadly, those 10 hours are spread among 100 hours.



Slightly more on-topic:
Data centers and servers over districts created one hell of a blow to the game's community, a blow that I doubt the game can ever recover from. They feel like cutting off one's arm because you can't be bothered to look for a bandage.

#17 smoke070z

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Posted 21 April 2013 - 01:41 PM

Man, this thread made me miss the emotes in GW1. So much fun!

There was something special about the town/city hubs, it felt like a rest stop and there were always interesting people around. I don't get the same feeling from GW2 at all.. not much reason to party w/ people since all content is so easy and not instanced. Community was amazing :)

#18 Omega X

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 04:49 AM

View PostDasryn, on 21 April 2013 - 07:15 AM, said:

i agree with this post that El Duderino posted:



this is happening and GW2 is the pinnacle of this development mentality.

action action action.

notice how when ANet wanted to pay homage to a time in gaming history, they threw back to old 8 bit platformers?

did you guys notice that?

they didnt throwback to pen paper concepts, they didnt throwback to any kind of exploration text type games like Hugo.

they threw back to the most simplistic game design ever.  now im not knocking on our childhood gems and memories, but lets be honest with each other - 8 bit games like mario were shallow.

and i believe that the 8 bit throw back we got was indication that thats where ANet's developmental focus is.  making content accessibly SIMPLE.  5 weapon skills, 4 utilities, a self heal, i mean, its easy to pick up and play, kinda like an old game troller that had start select A and B.

idk, i enjoy GW2 immensely however, i see a trend and idk how to feel about it.

That's a bit of a stretch.

A few people at ArenaNET got to do a project on optional 8-bit homage content that lasted a month.  Also there's at-least 3 D&D based MMOs out there or coming soon with a ton of off-shot clones.

I'm not sure you thought this through.

Edited by Omega X, 22 April 2013 - 04:50 AM.


#19 Dasryn

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 05:10 AM

View PostOmega X, on 22 April 2013 - 04:49 AM, said:

That's a bit of a stretch.

A few people at ArenaNET got to do a project on optional 8-bit homage content that lasted a month.  Also there's at-least 3 D&D based MMOs out there or coming soon with a ton of off-shot clones.

I'm not sure you thought this through.

i see waht you are saying, and maybe it was a bit over dramatic to say ANet's ENTIRE design direction was 8 bit inspired.

i think it is not too stretched to say that ANet is drawing inspiration from 8bit console platformers though.  i mean, a lot of RPG devs use Ultima as a reference when creating a game world let alone mmorpg.  i dont think thats the case with ANet, i think their limited skill approach and action oriented combat/content is console oriented.

#20 Longasc

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 05:42 AM

I think Dasryn and Loperdos are spot on.

GW2 was meant to be an "action" MMO. Always moving, clicking, few buttons to press and easy to get into.
This design idea has been realized. Definitely! But at what expense?

I also always wondered if GW2 designers had a "jumping trauma" from GW1 given how many jumping puzzles the game has. (Newsflash, ArenaNet, are you really sure MMO gamers are platformer game fans?)
But maybe it dates back to the core inspiration of its design. The desire to make MMOs more action oriented.
There is the problem: These 8-bit era platform or whatever games have little to do with MMO gaming. You cannot help people much if at all in a jumping puzzle. Either it's you who falls down and has to jump all of it again or the other, not much chance to help or cooperate except for killing some mobs.
I am also a bit worried that the exploration content is such a solo jumping affair.

Unfortunately ArenaNet lost people like Jeff Strain and some others. Colin Johanson created the GW1 Bonus Mission Pack, and this is where it started going down this wrong GW2 lane: It was very fun - but only once, twice and when people got their weapon skin of choice, they never went back. Unfortunately many hearts and events in GW2 are auto-attack clickfests and even the more difficult ones later are AoE mass zerg orgies (Balthazar Temple e.g.). The lower level bosses die so fast that one realizes that down/upscaling of player level has its limitations.

GW2's combat is fast paced and leaves little time for communication. I can type while fighting, most can't. There is no downtime after a fight, people go on into the next fight. Again no communication. You are alone. Your heart progress only counts for you, not for people in your party if you are in a party. Mobs and mob number adjust to you if you are solo or two, three players.

Guild Bounties etc. are quite social, their implementation is rather flawed though. The UI for them is hidden in the Guild Interface and they are not that "dynamic", fixed routes for every bounty.

Now take a look at the living story. Were you rocked by it so far? 10 minutes with Braham and Rox, then it's some generic events and scavenger hunts for weeks.

I took a break of some 3 months and recently got back into GW2. It's a beautiful game but I am sad to say it's fundamentally flawed and I doubt this can be fixed other than creating GW3. I read that no expansions are planned for the next time, so it is up to improved living story bits and... whatever... to keep us going.

I hope they do better than I fear, as the player churn of GW2 is enormous. I have seen guilds of 200-400 peeps go down to 2-3 players online, 1 of them maybe something one could consider "active". After 3 months many seem to be done with the game. I am not sure if many of them return like me.


P.S.: Guesting and Servers. This is also what destroyed and splintered the international GW1 community. Guesting is such a PITA, switch chars and don't forget to guest again, limit of 2 servers, most abuse it only for event farming oh my. Cannot visit American buddies anymore at all, not even for dungeon runs. :(

(off-topic but somehow nevertheless related: How would you continue developing GW2? If I would be given the task to expand on what's there, that's quite difficult. No wonder there is one jumping puzzle after another and a shallow story with the ever same events.)

Edited by Longasc, 22 April 2013 - 05:56 AM.


#21 Omega X

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 05:57 AM

Action MMOs are the hot new thing. Anything else is reverberated as a clone of WoW. Some people got tired of clicking hotbars full of 30 skills and only used 7-10 at a time. If you wanted to do that, then WoW is king, why go anywhere else? Companies that cloned WoW were left with very little after 4-6 months.

View PostDasryn, on 22 April 2013 - 05:10 AM, said:

i see waht you are saying, and maybe it was a bit over dramatic to say ANet's ENTIRE design direction was 8 bit inspired.

i think it is not too stretched to say that ANet is drawing inspiration from 8bit console platformers though.  i mean, a lot of RPG devs use Ultima as a reference when creating a game world let alone mmorpg.  i dont think thats the case with ANet, i think their limited skill approach and action oriented combat/content is console oriented.

That was due to not having jumping in the first Guild Wars. One of the sticking points in GW1 comparison arguments was that players couldn't do something as simple as jump. Now I don't deny that they would want to target consoles. Every company wants its game to run the gamut for maximum profitability. But  I doubt that Super Adventure Box is the basis by which all things in the game revolves around. Anet learned its lesson when it flooded GW1 with hundreds of skills and the competitive scene died. They took a conservative approach that still needs ironing out in a few spots.

#22 Susanoh

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 06:58 AM

The social aspect is definitely lacking in this game compared to the one I did play that did have a strong community. I would imagine the biggest contributor to the lack of community in this game is the ease in which everything can be done solo. All map content and story content is so easy that there's no need to group up unless you're running with a friend. It may actually be easier solo so that you can go at your own pace. Any open world events that may be mildly difficult are optional, and those still don't require you to actually socialize and group up or coordinate. As long as there's other bodies around, you can simply stroll up and do your thing along with them without ever saying a word.

The one type of content I can think of where you actually need to team up to complete it is dungeons, and even those don't tend to be very social outside of guild member groups. If you've done the run before, you can probably do it again in the exact same way, regardless of whoever else is in your group, so not much planning or coordination is required. At times people join and leave without saying a word before the run has started. Many never utter a complete sentence during the entire run. When it comes to the social aspect, I feel more like I'm joining a server to start up a quick RTS or FPS match than I do joining a group of people to play with in a true online game community.

#23 Dasryn

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 07:55 AM

personally im not seeing lack of community.

now this could be because im on one of the unofficial RP servers (tarnished Coast) but seriously, i see RPing all the time, in Orr there are actual mainstays that devote their time to clearing temples (Dagazz i think his name was) Dynamic Events are thru the roof, you see an event, you ping the closest WP in Map chat and players show up its incredible people.

now sure you arent going to see anyone in Lornar's pass or w/e but why should you?  there is RP in the towns - naturally, the DEs are happening at big events with most reward like the shatterer, jormag's claw, harathi hinterlands, the MAW.

but my point is i find the community at least on my server to be very fulfilling and engaging.

#24 DarkGanni

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 12:41 PM

Social Aspect? Can't say I've seen many people socializing. For me the fact that there isn't a World-Chat channel hurts the game.

I've been standing in Lions Arch for the past 10 mins now and the "chat" looks like this:

GLF 2 more for fractal
AC P1 glf 3 more
lfg fotm lvl1
........and the lfg messages go on

The only socializing this game gives is only if you're in a guild or with a group of friends, GW1 was much better in terms of socializing.

However it's true that GW2 did redefine the MMORPG genre by being A Massively Mute Online Role-less Playing Game

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#25 Phadde

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 12:45 PM

View PostSilock, on 14 April 2013 - 10:22 AM, said:

So what is there to do if you fancy just hanging out with friends in the game, aside from of course just sitting around and talking? Are their any good RP novelties we can use such as sitting on chairs, drinking animations, a large range of emotes and other such things like this?  It may sound daft but a lot about an mmo for me is not simply the fighting and crafting, it's a games social aspect to that is equally as important to me.

So what things are there to do that doesn't simply involve fighting and crafting, what social down time activities are there?

Thanks guys :)

They need to add more emotes along with animations. As an old World of Warcraft-player, I was surprised when I saw how few emotes we had available.

I can imagine that you'll find some joy when they finally launch the Mini Games besides Keg-"whatever-it's-called".


Since I play and chat with guildies on Team Speak all the time, I'm fairly satisfied with the social aspect. The game wouldn't even be half as fun without them.

Edited by Phadde, 25 April 2013 - 12:47 PM.


#26 OhFrustration

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 04:44 PM

View PostDarkGanni, on 25 April 2013 - 12:41 PM, said:

Social Aspect? Can't say I've seen many people socializing. For me the fact that there isn't a World-Chat channel hurts the game.

I've been standing in Lions Arch for the past 10 mins now and the "chat" looks like this:

GLF 2 more for fractal
AC P1 glf 3 more
lfg fotm lvl1
........and the lfg messages go on

The only socializing this game gives is only if you're in a guild or with a group of friends, GW1 was much better in terms of socializing.

However it's true that GW2 did redefine the MMORPG genre by being A Massively Mute Online Role-less Playing Game

The weird thing is that I'm currently in two different guilds with around 100 members each with a total of roughly 20 of them online. One of the guilds is a successor of the GW1 Marked Frostclaw where I used to be an officer and the other is a new guild that I joined to socialize a bit more.

[Claw] is as quiet as if no one was online. I know almost all the active players, we did tons and tons of stuff together in GW1, and I know that they're crazy talkative people. I've spent hundreds of hours chatting with them. In GW2 they hardly ever type anything in chat and some of them haven't logged on in weeks. The TeamSpeak server is still up but there's usually only one or two people online and even they are on the idle channel.

The new guild is really quiet as well but I guess that's because no one knows each other.

After the game's release I've been in a party twice.

Twice.

Being a person who likes to party up with others to play it's really boring to see another player simply disappear when I walk by. It's terribly difficult to find people to play GW2 with, I think. It's supposed to be a massively multiplayer game. (I don't really like playing alone and that's why I usually watch LP:s of single-player games instead of playing them myself; someone talking over a video recording of a game feels almost like playing with someone else. I know, this sounds weird and sad in a way, but I like it that way.)

#27 Bohya

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 04:52 PM

Guild Wars 2 has no social aspect because of several major reasons:

>Multiple guilds
>Overflow servers
>Loading screens
>Dynamic events

ArenaNet really need to fix the problem. You meet someone once and you never come across that same name again... and that's even if you care to acknowledge the person, which has been made redundant due to dyanmic events.

#28 Phadde

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 05:23 PM

View PostiAmPesukone, on 28 April 2013 - 04:44 PM, said:

The weird thing is that I'm currently in two different guilds with around 100 members each with a total of roughly 20 of them online. One of the guilds is a successor of the GW1 Marked Frostclaw where I used to be an officer and the other is a new guild that I joined to socialize a bit more.

[Claw] is as quiet as if no one was online. I know almost all the active players, we did tons and tons of stuff together in GW1, and I know that they're crazy talkative people. I've spent hundreds of hours chatting with them. In GW2 they hardly ever type anything in chat and some of them haven't logged on in weeks. The TeamSpeak server is still up but there's usually only one or two people online and even they are on the idle channel.

The new guild is really quiet as well but I guess that's because no one knows each other.

After the game's release I've been in a party twice.

Twice.

Being a person who likes to party up with others to play it's really boring to see another player simply disappear when I walk by. It's terribly difficult to find people to play GW2 with, I think. It's supposed to be a massively multiplayer game. (I don't really like playing alone and that's why I usually watch LP:s of single-player games instead of playing them myself; someone talking over a video recording of a game feels almost like playing with someone else. I know, this sounds weird and sad in a way, but I like it that way.)

As a swede, I play in a Swedish guild. We're generally around 4-10 people in the social channel on Team Speak and around twice as much on the entire TS server every day between 15:00-22:00. I "know" around 25 people in my guild who's quite often on TS. Everyone talks and jokes around with one another and it's generally only quiet when people are really tired for whatever reason. It's easy to start several dungeon-runs every day (although everyone laughs when I asks if anyone wants to join me in AC nowadays. I need the XP on my alt and I know 2 of them are going to need Gift of Ascalon sooner or later and then they're stuck with me in the Catacombs ;) ).

We run Guild Missions about twice a week and at that point there's tons of people on our TS Server. It's even more during the monthly "Guild-improvement-meeting".

Before I joined this guild I was apart of the 3 other (probably) biggest Swedish guilds and the social aspect was
dead. I wouldn't have half as fun in this game without being in such a great guild.



Find a great social guild.

Edited by Phadde, 28 April 2013 - 05:35 PM.


#29 OhFrustration

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 07:39 PM

View PostPhadde, on 28 April 2013 - 05:23 PM, said:


Find a great social guild.
B-b-but... [Claw] is... Or at least it used to be a social guild. Occasionally when I log on to GW1 the peeps still chat around a little, though because of the low number of players online there's not much going on anymore. The GW2 guild chat is totally or close to quiet, which annoys me.

Though, every other chat is quiet too. All I see is NPCs waving at me and talking about each other. Nobody seems to type anything in the chat. Well, I rarely even see anybody else.

#30 Baron von Scrufflebutt

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 09:57 PM

View PostPhadde, on 28 April 2013 - 05:23 PM, said:

Find a great social guild.

The problem is that this is true for many games out there. Not only that, other games do guilds better or/and they are able to create a fascinating social experience without forcing players to join a guild.
It seems that the biggest upside to the GW2 social experience lies in the idea that social interactions can't really piss you off: there's no lows, but at the same time, there's really no highs to this experience either.


It's basically the story of GW2: the game fails to fail at anything, but it also fails to create anything truly remarkable. Well, outside of the charr animation: those are pretty darn sweet!
And jiggly boobs.




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